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Friday, Apr. 29, 2016

Greencastle resident becomes new partner at Baker & Daniels

Monday, January 12, 2009

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INDIANAPOLIS -- Terry E. Hall of Greencastle became a partner at Baker & Daniels LLP on Jan. 1. She was one of eight former associates admitted to partner during the law firm's annual partnership meeting.

Hall leads the firm's energy and climate change legal team from the downtown Indianapolis office where she also practices in commercial transactions and business restructuring. Hall also is a registered civil mediator in the State of Indiana.

Hall is active in emerging issues with energy and climate change. She is involved in the American Bar Association's section on environment, energy and resources, serving as vice chair on several subcommittees focused on renewable energy, finance and climate change. Hall also is a member of the Energy Bar Association, an association of professionals in the practice, administration and development of energy laws, regulations and policies.

Hall has given presentations on a number of energy topics, including financing renewable energy projects, the business of carbon, energy independence and the legal practice of climate change. Before joining Baker & Daniels in 2001, she was a consultant to cities, towns and counties in Indiana on economic development and land use issues.

Hall earned her law degree summa cum laude from the Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis in 2000. She graduated magna cum laude with her bachelor's degree from the University of Texas at Austin.

Founded in 1863, Baker & Daniels LLP is one of Indiana's largest law firms. With more than 370 lawyers and legal professionals, Baker & Daniels serves clients in regional, national and international transaction, regulatory and litigation matters from offices in Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, South Bend, Chicago, Washington, D.C. and Beijing. For more information about Baker & Daniels, visit www.bakerdaniels.com.



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