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Friday, Mar. 27, 2015

Bledsoe to enter change of plea

Thursday, February 10, 2011

(Photo)
GREENCASTLE -- The trial of a Reelsville man accused in the shooting death of his wife has been called off.

Jeremy R. Bledsoe, 32, is charged with felony murder in connection with the Jan. 13, 2010 shooting death of his wife Kathryne, 31. Bledsoe was set to go to trial Feb. 16.

However, Bledsoe's court-appointed attorney, Sidney Tongret, requested a change of plea hearing, which has been slated for March 3.

Putnam County Prosecutor Tim Bookwalter said he didn't know what led Tongret to make the request, calling it a "one-sided affair."

"There has been no plea offered, and there won't be," he said.

If Bledsoe is convicted, he could be sentenced to a maximum of 65 years in prison. Bookwalter said Bledsoe did not meet the criteria necessary to be sentenced to death.

The minimum sentence for felony murder is 45 years.

Kathryne Bledsoe was shot dead in the bathroom of her Reelsville home.

The cause of death was listed in court documents as a single gunshot wound to the head.

The Bledsoes, who had been married for 10 years, had lived in Reelsville for about two years at the time of the shooting. They shared three children -- one elementary-aged and two toddlers. The two younger children were at home when the shooting occurred.

Kathryne Bledsoe's family members said Kathryne was planning to file for divorce.

Jeremy Bledsoe's grandmother, Ava Bledsoe, also lived at the home, and it was she who reported the shooting.

Eyewitnesses told police Jeremy Bledsoe fled the home right after the shooting.

He remained at large for 12 hours before being apprehended without incident in the Cunot area.

On the state's recommendation, Bledsoe has been held without bond at the Putnam County Jail since his arrest.

Bledsoe has a criminal history of mostly minor offenses, such as public intoxication, illegal consumption of alcohol, resisting law enforcement, driving while intoxicated and driving while suspended.

He had also faced charges of intimidation and battery, but those were dropped.


Comments
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There is an old saying " A person who represents himself has a fool for a client." But then again he who has a P.D will get the service he pays for. I am sorry but you would have to be foolish to think even Sid would do a change of plea in a murder case without some sort of deal with the prosecution. Anyless he is looking to get it overturned due to " Ineffective Assistance of Counsel." So I find it hard to believe there is not a verbal agreement in place..Not sure but I dont think it is an election year. But then again in our county a case like that could be politically damaging for a prosecutor.

-- Posted by Oh My Goodness on Thu, Feb 10, 2011, at 8:10 AM

his plea agreement should be a choice of hanging or firing squad.............

-- Posted by tru story on Thu, Feb 10, 2011, at 8:13 AM

Are you serious about the PD comment? A PD works just as hard for their clients as a private attorney. PDs provide representation for individuals who are unable to afford an attorney. Otherwise they would be forced to be the "fool" who represents him/herself. In regard to the other comment, no, there doesn't have to be a verbal agreement in place to have a change of plea. You are assuming the client himself hasn't made that decision, regardless of how his attorney has advised him. Maybe, he has decided to plea and hope the court will be lenient. Might I suggest you think before you engage.

-- Posted by What next on Thu, Feb 10, 2011, at 11:41 AM

From what I have seen most lawyers don't want to have to fight anything in trial - they prefer the defendent agrees to a plea deal even if they don't think they are guilty. They scare them with what will happen if the jury finds them guilty.

-- Posted by indianamama on Thu, Feb 10, 2011, at 1:14 PM

My previous comments really have nothing to do with this particular case. If he killed her he needs to pay.

-- Posted by indianamama on Thu, Feb 10, 2011, at 1:15 PM

Public defenders do not work just as hard as a paid attorney. PD's only work a couple days of the week and handle much heavier case loads, thus able to spend far less time doing what's best for their clients.

For example, I know someone who had Tongret once, Sidney informed him that he'd be able to work him out a deal where he received an 8 year sentence, with 2 suspended to probation. Darrel Felling was promptly hired after receiving that information and the 8 years was reduced to a 3 year sentence, with 2 suspended to probation and the 1 year served on home detention.

-- Posted by KeyboardWarrior on Fri, Feb 11, 2011, at 9:15 AM

Anybody that says a PD works as hard as a retained lawyer has never had one.

-- Posted by obeone on Fri, Feb 11, 2011, at 9:40 AM

Here's a thought either stay out of trouble and you won't need a Public Defender or get a job and if you get in trouble hire your own!

-- Posted by hardtobelieve on Fri, Feb 11, 2011, at 1:01 PM

Not for sure about the PD thing you guys keep bringing up but I feel Tru Story hit the nail on the head with their comment!!

-- Posted by bottomline on Fri, Feb 11, 2011, at 9:40 PM

Keyboard Warrior wrote---

For example, I know someone who had Tongret once, Sidney informed him that he'd be able to work him out a deal where he received an 8 year sentence, with 2 suspended to probation. Darrel Felling was promptly hired after receiving that information and the 8 years was reduced to a 3 year sentence, with 2 suspended to probation and the 1 year served on home detention.

This type of situation or agreement isn't a case of an ineffective Public Defender. This is a case of local politics or "backscratching."

-- Posted by ProblemTransmission on Sat, Feb 12, 2011, at 10:04 AM

the putnam county pd office,s are a joke. they wont hardly speak to their clients and wont make jail visit,s they expect to see the person just before they walk into court . are they worth their money no! they are paid by the same people who pay bookwalter.yes i belive this man should get what he,s got coming to him it was a hanus act and he should get back 2 fold as far as i,m concerned.

-- Posted by mrcatfish43 on Sat, Feb 12, 2011, at 7:45 PM


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